Bibliography of Secondary Criticism

Compiled by members of the Glasgow David Foster Wallace Research Group, this regularly updated bibliography collates academic criticism that has been published on David Foster Wallace’s writing. It does not include the many excellent studies (such as Frederick Karl’s American Fictions 1980-2000 [2001]) that only mention Wallace’s work in passing, or theses and dissertations devoted to Wallace (many of which are available through the indispensable Howling Fantods page).

The bibliography aims for completeness, but please send citations of materials we’ve missed.

Last updated: 7 September 2017.
PART ONE: BOOKS ABOUT DAVID FOSTER WALLACE
PART TWO: ARTICLES AND BOOK CHAPTERS

———

PART ONE: BOOKS ABOUT DAVID FOSTER WALLACE

———

Bolger, Robert K. and Scott Korb, eds. Gesturing Toward Reality: David Foster Wallace and Philosophy. New York: Bloomsbury, 2014.

Korb, Scott. “Love, and What You Will, Do: An Introduction.” 1-4.

Burgess, Alexis. “How We Ought to Do Things with Words.” 5-18.

de la Durantaye, Leland. “The Subsurface Unity of All Things, or David Foster Wallace’s Free Will.” 19-29.

Bolger, Robert K. “A Less ‘Bullshitty’ Way to Live: The Pragmatic Spirituality of David Foster Wallace.” 31-51.

Timpe, Kevin. “This is Water and Religious Self-Deception.” 53-68.

Bennett, Andrew. “Inside David Foster Wallace’s Head: Attention, Loneliness, Suicide, and the Other Side of Boredom.” 69-83.

Jones, Robert C. “The Lobster Considered.” 85-102.

Vermeule, Blakey. “The Terrible Master: David Foster Wallace and the Suffering of Consciousness (with guest Arthur Schopenhauer).” 103-20.

Bustillos, Maria. “Philosophy, Self-Help, and the Death of David Wallace.” 121-39.

Baskin, Jon. “Untrendy Problems: The Pale King’s Philosophical Inspirations.” 141-56.

Tracey, Thomas. “The Formative Years: David Foster Wallace’s Philosophical Influences and The Broom of the System.” 157-75.

Ramal, Randy. “Beyond Philosophy: David Foster Wallace on Literature, Wittgenstein, and the Dangers of Theorizing.” 177-98.

Dulk, Allard den. “Good Faith and Sincerity: Sartrean Virtues of Self-Becoming in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” 199-220.

Mullins, Ryan David. “Theories of Everything and More: Infinity is not the End.” 221-43.

Horn, Patrick. “Does Language Fail Us? Wallace’s Struggle with Solipsism.” 245-70.

Boswell, Marshall. Understanding David Foster Wallace. Understanding Contemporary Amer. Lit. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 2003.

—. ed. David Foster Wallace and “The Long Thing”: New Essays on the Novels. New York: Bloomsbury, 2014.

Boswell, Marshall. “Preface: David Foster Wallace and ‘The Long Thing.’” vi-xii.

Kelly, Adam. “David Foster Wallace and the Novel of Ideas. 3-22.

Staes, Toon. “Wallace and Empathy: A Narrative Approach. 23-42.

Dulk, Allard den. “Boredom, Irony, and Anxiety: Wallace and the Kierkegaardian View of the Self.” 43-60.

Warren, Andrew. “Modelling Community and Narrative in Infinite Jest and The Pale King. 61-82.

Fest, Bradley J. “‘Then Out of the Rubble’: David Foster Wallace’s Early Fiction.” 85-105.

Sayers, Philip. “Representing Entertainment in Infinite Jest.” 107-25.

Letzler, David. “Encyclopedic Novels and the Cruft of Fiction: Infinite Jest’s Endnotes.” 127-47.

Burn, Stephen J. “‘A Paradigm for the Life of Consciousness’: The Pale King.” 149-68.

Wouters, Conley. “‘What am I, a Machine?’: Humans and Information in The Pale King.” 169-86.

Clare, Ralph. “The Politics of Boredom and the Boredom of Politics in The Pale King.” 187-207.

Boswell, Marshall. “Trickle-Down Citizenship: Taxes and Civic Responsibility in The Pale King.” 209-25.

Boswell, Marshall, and Stephen J. Burn, eds. A Companion to David Foster Wallace Studies. New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2013.

Burn, Stephen J. and Marshall Boswell. “Preface.” ix-xii.

O’Donnell, Patrick. “Almost a Novel: The Broom of the System.” 1-22.

Boddy, Kasia. “A Fiction of Response: Girl with Curious Hair in Context.” 23-41.

Natalini, Roberto. “David Foster Wallace and the Mathematics of Infinity.” 43-57.

Burn, Stephen J. “‘Webs of Nerves Pulsing and Firing’: Infinite Jest and the Science of Mind.” 59-85.

Quinn, Paul. “Location’s Location: Placing David Foster Wallace.” 87-106.

Holland, Mary K. “Mediated Immediacy in Brief Interviews with Hideous Men.” 107-130.

Hayes-Brady, Clare. “‘…’: Language, Gender, and Modes of Power in the Work of David Foster Wallace.” 131-50.

Boswell, Marshall. “‘The Constant Monologue Inside Your Head’: Oblivion and the Nightmare of Consciousness.” 151-70.

Evans, David H. “‘The Chains of Not Choosing’: Free Will and Faith in William James and David Foster Wallace.” 171-89.

McHale, Brian. “The Pale King, Or, The White Visitation.” 191-210.

Hoberek, Andrew. “The Novel after David Foster Wallace.” 211-228.

Burn, Stephen J. David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest: A Reader’s Guide. New York: Continuum, 2003.

. David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest: A Reader’s Guide. Expanded 2nd ed. New York: Bloomsbury, 2012.

Cahn, Steven M. and Maureen Eckert, eds. Freedom and the Self: Essays on the Philosophy of David Foster Wallace. New York: Columbia University Press, 2015.

Cahn, Steven M. and Maureen Eckert. “Introduction.” vii-x.

William Hasker. “David Foster Wallace and the Fallacies of ‘Fatalism.’” 1-29.

Sher, Gila. “Wallace, Free Choice, and Fatalism.” 31-56.

Fiocco, M. Oreste. “Fatalism and the Metaphysics of Contingency.” 57-92.

Eckert, Maureen. “Fatalism, Time Travel, and System J.” 93-107.

Kelly, Daniel R. “David Foster Wallace as American Hedgehog.” 109-32.

Ballantyne, Nathan and Justin Tosi. “David Foster Wallace on the Good Life.” 133-68.

Carlisle, Greg. Elegant Complexity: A Study of David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest. Los Angeles: Sideshow, 2007.

. Nature’s Nightmare: Analyzing David Foster Wallace’s Oblivion. Los Angeles: Sideshow, 2013.

Cohen, Samuel and Lee Konstantinou, eds. The Legacy of David Foster Wallace. New Amer. Canon. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2012.

Cohen, Samuel and Lee Konstantinou. “Introduction: Zoologists, Elephants, and Editors.” xi-xxv.

Giles, Paul. “All Swallowed Up: David Foster Wallace and American Literature.” 3-22.

DeLillo, Don. “Informal Remarks from the David Foster Wallace Memorial Service in New York on October 23, 2008.” 23-24.

Roiland, Josh. “Getting Away from it All: The Literary Journalism of David Foster Wallace and Nietzsche’s Concept of Oblivion.” 25-52.

Saunders, George. “Informal Remarks from the David Foster Wallace Memorial Service in New York on October 23, 2008.” 53-55.

Cohen, Samuel. “To Wish to Try to Sing to the Next Generation: Infinite Jest’s History.” 59-79.

Moody, Rick. “Tribute Written for Wallace Family Memorial Book, 2008. 80-82.

Konstantinou, Lee. “No Bull: David Foster Wallace and Postironic Belief.” 83-112.

Lipsky, David. “An Interview with David Foster Wallace.” 113-117.

Houser, Heather. “Infinite Jest’s Environmental Case for Disgust.” 118-42.

Eggers, Dave. “Foreword to Tenth Anniversary Edition of Infinite Jest.” 143-48.

Finn, Ed. “Becoming Yourself: The Afterlife of Reception.” 151-76.

Franzen, Jonathan. “Informal Remarks from the David Foster Wallace Memorial Service in New York on October 23, 2008.” 177-81.

Fitzpatrick, Kathleen. “Infinite Summer: Reading, Empathy, and the Social Network.” 182-207.

Pietsch, Michael and Rick Moody. “On Editing David Foster Wallace: An Interview.” 208-17.

Nadel, Ira B. “Consider the Footnote.” 218-40.

Schwartzburg, Molly. “Conclusion: Observations on the Archive at the Harry Ransom Center.” 241-59.

Coleman, Philip, ed. Critical Insights: David Foster Wallace. Ipswich, MA: Salem, 2015.

Coleman, Philip. “On David Foster Wallace.” 3-19.

Coleman, Philip. “Biography of David Foster Wallace.” 20-25.

Benzon, Kiki. “David Foster Wallace and Millennial America.” 29-45.

Kelly, Adam. “David Foster Wallace: the Critical Reception.” 46-62.

Hayes-Brady, Clare. “‘Personally I’m Neutral on the Menstruation Point’: David Foster Wallace and Gender.” 63-77.

Sheridan, Mark. “Interpret You, INTERPRET-ME? Or, Fictional Pasts and Fictional Futures: The Predecessors and Contemporaries of David Foster Wallace.” 78-93.

O’Gara, Aisling. “An Understanding of One’s Place in the System: An Introduction to The Broom of the System.” 97-111.

Ellerhoff, Steve Gronert. “Proteus Bound: Pinning Girl with Curious Hair under Short Story Theory.” 112-127.

Hering, David. “Form as Strategy in Infinite Jest.” 128-43.

Resar, Alexander. “Signifying Everything: Mapping the Subject in Infinite Jest.” 144-59.

Coughlan, David. “‘Sappy or No, it’s True’: Affect and Expression in Brief Interviews with Hideous Men.” 160-75.

Nixon, Charles, “Attention, Retention, and Extension in Oblivion: Stories.” 176-91.

Callan, Ron. “‘E Pluribus Unum’: David Foster Wallace’s A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again: Essays and Arguments.” 192-208.

Nadel, Ira. “‘The Nature of the Fun’: The Late Essays of David Foster Wallace.” 209-20.

Groenland, Tim. “A King of Shreds and Patches: Assembling Wallace’s Final Novel.” 221-37.

Araya, Jorge. “Why the Whiteness?: Race in The Pale King.” 238-51.

Mahon, Áine. “Difficulties of Reality in Cora Diamond and David Foster Wallace.” 252-67.

Woods, Aengus. “Early-Morning Uncertainties: Anxiety, Abstraction, and infinity in Everything and More: A Compact History of ∞. 268-85.

Dowling, William and Robert Bell. A Reader’s Companion to Infinite Jest. N.p.: Xlibris, 2005.

Dulk, Allard den. Existentialist Engagement in Wallace, Eggers, and Foer. New York: Bloomsbury, 2015.

Hayes-Brady, Clare. The Unspeakable Failures of David Foster Wallace: Language, Identity, and Resistance. New York: Bloomsbury, 2016.

Hering, David. David Foster Wallace: Fiction and Form. New York: Bloomsbury, 2016.

—. ed. Consider David Foster Wallace: Critical Essays. Los Angeles: Sideshow, 2010.

Hering, David. “Editor’s Preface.” 1-11.

Carlisle, Greg. “Introduction: Consider David Foster Wallace.” 12-23.

Hayes-Brady, Clare. “The Book, the Broom and the Ladder: Philosophical Groundings in the Work of David Foster Wallace.” 24-36.

Foster, Graham. “A Blasted Region: David Foster Wallace’s Man-made Landscapes.” 37-48.

Luther, Connie. “David Foster Wallace: Westward with Fredric Jameson.” 49-61.

Coleman, Philip. “Consider Berkeley & Co.: Reading ‘Westward the Course of Empire Takes its Way.’” 62-74.

Phipps, Gregory. “The Ideal Athlete: John Wayne in Infinite Jest.” 75-88.

Hering, David. “Infinite Jest: Triangles, Cycles, Choices, & Chases.” 89-100.

Benzon, Kiki. “‘Yet Another Example of the Porousness of Certain Borders’: Chaos and Realism in Infinite Jest.” 101-12.

Tresco, Matt. “Impervious to U.S. Parsing: Encyclopedism, Autism, and Infinite Jest.” 113-122.

Thomas, Christopher. “Infinite Jests: David Foster Wallace & Laurence Sterne.” 123-30.

Kelly, Adam. “David Foster Wallace and the New Sincerity in American Fiction.” 131-46.

Diakoulakis, Christoforos. “‘Quote Unquote love . . . a Type of Scotopoia’: David Foster Wallace’s Brief Interviews with Hideous Men.” 147-55.

Goerlandt, Iannis. “‘That is Not Wholly True’: Notes on Annotation in David Foster Wallace’s Shorter Fiction (and Non-Fiction).” 156-71.

Tracey, Thomas. “Representations of Trauma in David Foster Wallace’s Oblivion.” 172-86.

Ribbat, Christoph. “Seething Static: Notes on Wallace and Journalism.” 187-98.

Jenner, Paul. “Don’t Compare, Identify: David Foster Wallace on John McCain.” 199-208.

Turnbull, Daniel. “This is Water and the Ethics of Attention: Wallace, Murdoch and Nussbaum.” 209-17.

Severs, Jeffrey. David Foster Wallace’s Balancing Books: Fictions of Value. New York: Columbia University Press, 2017.

Thompson, Lucas. Global Wallace: David Foster Wallace and World Literature. New York: Bloomsbury, 2016.

———

PART TWO: ARTICLES AND BOOK CHAPTERS

———

Andersen, Tore Rye. “Down with the Rebels! David Foster Wallace and Postironical Literature.” Cultural Text Studies 1 (2006): 197-208.

.“Judging by the Cover.” Critique 53.3 (2012): 251-78.

. “Pay Attention! David Foster Wallace and His Real Enemies.” English Studies 95.1 (2014): 7-24.

Aubry, Timothy. “Selfless cravings: Addiction and Recovery in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” American Fiction of the 1990s: Reflections of History and Culture. Ed. Jay Prosser. London: Routledge, 2008. 206-219. Rpt. in Aubry, Reading as Therapy: What Contemporary Fiction Does for Middle-Class Americans. Iowa: University of Iowa Press, 2011. 97-126.

Banner, Olivia. “‘They’re Literally Shit’: Masculinity and the Work of Art in an Age of Waste Recycling.Iowa Journal of Cultural Studies 10-11 (2009): 74-90. Web.

Bartlett, Christopher. “‘An Exercise in Telemachry’: David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest and Intergenerational Conversation.” Critique 57.4 (2016): 374-89.

Bennett, Alice. “Ghostwords: Mind-Reading and the Dead Narrator.” Afterlife and Narrative in Contemporary Fiction. New York: Palgrave, 2012. 117-47.

Benzon, Kiki. “Darkness Legible, Unquiet Lines: Mood Disorders and the Fiction of David Foster Wallace.” Creativity, Madness and Civilisation. Ed. Richard Pine. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007. 189-199.

Bird, Benjamin. “History, Emotion, and the Body: Mourning in Post-9/11 Fiction.” Literature Compass 4.3 (2007): 561-75.

Birkerts, Sven. “The Sentence: David Foster Wallace.” Sonora Review 55-56 (2009): 7-12.

Bleakley, Alan, and Margaretta Jolly. “Writing Out Prescriptions: Hyperrealism and the Chemical Regulation of Mood.” Advances in Health Science Education 17 (2012): 779-790.

Bono, Marta. “Reactions to Chaos Theory: The Mathematical References in the Notes of Infinite Jest.” Lettera Matematica 3.4 (2015): 295-98.

Boswell, Marshall. “Author Here: The Legal Fiction of David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” English Studies 95.1 (2014): 25-39.

. “Heading Westward.” Sonora Review 55-56 (2009): 28-32.

. “The Rival Lover: David Foster Wallace and the Anxiety of Influence in Jeffrey Eugenides’s The Marriage Plot.” Modern Fiction Studies 62.3 (2016): 499-518.

. “Trickle-Down Citizenship: Taxes and Civic Responsibility in David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” Studies in the Novel 44.4 (2012): 464-79. Rpt. in Boswell, David Foster Wallace and the Long Thing, 209-25.

Bresnan, Mark. “The Work of Play in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Critique 50.1 (2008): 51-68.

Brick, Martin. “A Postmodernist’s Progress: Thoughts on Spirituality Across the David Foster Wallace Canon.” Christianity and Literature 64.1 (2014): 65-81.

Burn, Stephen J. “Generational Succession and a Possible Source for the title of David Foster Wallace’s The Broom of the System.” Notes on Contemporary Literature 33.2 (2003): 9-11.

. “‘The Machine-Language of the Muscles: Reading, Sport, and the Self in Infinite Jest.” Upon Further Review: Essays on American Sports Literature. Ed. Michael Cocchiarale and Scott D. Emmert. Westport, Co.: Greenwood, 2004. 41-50.

. “‘A Paradigm for the Life of Consciousness’: The Pale King.” Studies in the Novel 44.4 (2012): 371-88. Rpt. in Boswell, David Foster Wallace and the Long Thing, 149-68.

. “Second-Generation Postmoderns.” The Cambridge History of Postmodern Literature. Ed. Brian McHale and Len Platt. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016. 450-464.

. “Toward a General Theory of Vision in Wallace’s Fiction.” English Studies 95.1 (2014): 85-93.

Carlisle, Greg. “Wallace’s Infinite Fiction.” Sonora Review 55-56 (2009): 33-37.

Cioffi, Frank Louis. “‘An Anguish Become Thing’: Narrative as Performance in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Narrative 8.2 (2000): 161-181.

Clare, Ralph. “The Politics of Boredom and the Boredom of Politics in David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” Studies in the Novel 44.4 (2012): 428-46. Rpt. in Boswell, David Foster Wallace and the Long Thing, 187-207.

Cockfield, Arthur J. “David Foster Wallace on Tax Policy, How to Be an Adult and Other Mysteries of the Universe.” Pittsburgh Tax Review 12 (2015): 89-109.

Cohen, Samuel. “The Whiteness of David Foster Wallace.” Postmodern Literature and Race. Ed. Len Platt and Sara Upstone. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. 228-243.

Collignon, Fabienne. “USA Murated Nation, or, the Sublime Spherology of Security Culture.” Journal of American Studies 49.1 (2015): 99-123.

Curtis, Paul M. “‘Yo Man so what’s Your Story’: The Double Bind and Addiction in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Mosaic 49.4 (2016): 37-52.

Daalder, Jurrit. “‘A Place to Fear and Love’: The Imagined Heartland of David Foster Wallace’s The Broom of the System.” Midwestern Literature. Ed. Robert Primeau. Ipswich, MA: Salem, 2013.

Darling, Matthew J. “David Foster Wallace and the Athlete’s War with the Self.” Critical Insights: American Sports Fiction. Ed. Michael Cocchiarale and Scott D. Emmert. Ipswich, MA: Salem, 2013. 209-30.

Dawson, Paul. “The Direct Address and the Ironic Moralist.” The Return of the Omniscient Narrator. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, 2013. 62-87.

De Bourcier, Simon. “Forms, Punch Cards and LETTERS: Self-Reference, Recursion and (Un)self-Consciousness in The Pale King’s Representation of Bureaucracy.” English Studies 95.1 (2014): 40-58.

. “‘They All Sound Like David Foster Wallace’: Syntax and Narrative in Infinite Jest, Brief Interviews with Hideous Men, Oblivion and The Pale King.Orbit 5.2 (2017): n. pag. Web.

Di Leo, Jeffrey. “Sovereignty of the Dead: Authors, Editors, and the Aesthetic Text.” Comparatist 36 (2012): 123-36.

Dolo, Eva. “Too Much Fun: Endnotes in Infinite Jest.” Symbolism 15 (2015): 75-100.

Dorson, James. “The Neoliberal Machine in the Bureaucratic Garden: Pastoral States of Mind in David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” Rereading the Machine in the Garden: Nature and Technology in American Culture. Ed. Eric Erbacher, Nicole Maruo-Schröder, and Florian Sedlmeier. Frankfurt-on-Main: Verlag, 2014. 211-30.

Dreyfus, Hubert and Sean Dorrance Kelly. “David Foster Wallace’s Nihilism.” All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age. New York: Free-Simon, 2011. 22-57.

Dulk, Allard den. “Beyond Endless ‘Aesthetic’ Irony: A Comparison of the Irony Critique of Søren Kierkegaard And David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Studies in the Novel 44.3 (2012): 325-45.

. “The Transcendence of a Meaningful Life: The Portrayal of the Contemporary Self in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Looking Beyond? Shifting Views of Transcendence in Philosophy, Theology, Art, and Politics. Ed. Wessel Stoker and W.L. van der Merwe. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2012. 413-29.

. “Wallace and Wittgenstein: Literature as Dialogue Concerning the Real World.” Philosophy and Literature and the Crisis of Metaphysics. Ed. Sébastian Hüsch. Würzburg: Verlag, 2011. 343-58. Rpt. in Dulk, Existential Engagement. New York: Bloomsbury, 2015. 132-160.

Elderon, Shannon. “The Shaping of Stories Selves in David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” Critique 55.5 (2014): 508-521.

Ercolino, Stefano. “The Killing Vision: David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Imaginary Films in Literature. Ed. Ercolino et al. Leiden: Brill, 2016. 18-34.

Eve, Martin Paul. “Thomas Pynchon, David Foster Wallace and the Problems of ‘Metamodernism’: Post-Millennial Post-postmodernism?” C21 1.1 (2012): 7-25.

Fest, Bradley J. “The Inverted Nuke in the Garden: Archival Emergence and Anti-Eschatology in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Boundary 2 39.3 (2012): 125-49.

. “‘Then Out of the Rubble’: The Apocalypse in David Foster Wallace’s Early Fiction.” Studies in the Novel 44.3 (2012): 284-303. Rpt. in Boswell, David Foster Wallace and the Long Thing, 85-105.

Fordham, Finn. “Katabasis in Danielewski’s House of Leaves and Two Other Recent American Novels.” Mark Z. Danielewski. Ed. Joe Bray and Alison Gibbons. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2011. 33-51.

Foster, Graham. “A Deep Insider’s Elegiac Tribute: The Work of Don DeLillo in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.Orbit 4.2 (2016): n. pag. Web.

Freudenthal, Elizabeth. “Anti-Interiority: Compulsiveness, Objectification, and Identity in Infinite Jest.” New Literary History 41.1 (2010): 191-211.

Frost, Laura Catherine. “Coda: Modernism’s Afterlife in the Age of Prosthetic Pleasure.” The Problem with Pleasure: Modernism and its Discontents. New York: Columbia UP, 2013. 236-44.

Gerdes, Kendall. “Habit-Forming: Humility and the Rhetoric of Drugs.” Philosophy and Rhetoric 48.3 (2015): 337-58.

Giles, Paul. “Sentimental Posthumanism: David Foster Wallace.” Twentieth-Century Literature 53.5 (2007): 327-344. Rpt. in Giles, The Global Remapping of American Literature. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2011. 161-75.

Godden, Richard and Michael Szalay. “The Bodies in the Bubble: David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” Textual Practice 28.7 (2014): 1273-1322.

Goeke, Joseph F. “‘Everyone Knows it’s About Something Else, Way Down’: Boredom, Nihilism, and the Search for Meaning in David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” Critique 58.3 (2017): 191-213.

Goerlandt, Iannis. “‘Put the Book Down and Slowly Walk Away’: Irony and David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Critique 47.3 (2006): 309-328.

. “‘Still Steaming as its Many Arms Extended’: Pain in David Foster Wallace’s ‘Incarnations of Burned Children.’” Sprachkunst 37.2 (2006): 297-308.

Goodwin, Jonathan. “Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Explicator 61.2 (2003): 122-124.

Grassian, Daniel. “Resisting and Questioning Desire: How to Enjoy Being Awkward and Miserable with David Foster Wallace,” “The Search for the Self in Postmodern America: The Broom of the System,” and “Hideous Relationships in the ’90s: Brief Interviews with Hideous Men.” Hybrid Fictions: American Literature and Generation X. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2003. 36-42, 80-85, and 94-99.

Haddad, Vincent. Conjuring David Foster Wallace’s Ghost: Prosopopoiea, Whitmanian Intimacy and the Queer Potential of Infinite Jest and The Pale King.Orbit 5.2 (2017): n. pag. Web.

Hamilton, Robert C. “‘Constant Bliss in Every Atom’: Tedium and Transcendence in David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” Arizona Quarterly 70.4 (2014): 167-90.

Harris, Charles B. “The Anxiety of Influence: The John Barth/David Foster Wallace Connection.” Critique 55.2 (2014): 103-126.

. “David Foster Wallace’s Hometown: A Correction.” Critique 51.3 (2010): 185-86.

. “David Foster Wallace: ‘That Distinctive Singular Stamp of Himself’.” Critique: Studies in Contemporary Literature 51.2 (2010): 168-76.

Hayes-Brady, Clare. ‘I Kept Saying Her Name’: Naming, Labels, and Power in David Foster Wallace.Orbit 5.2 (2017): n. pag. Web.

Hayles, N. Katherine. “The Illusion of Autonomy and the Fact of Recursivity: Virtual Ecologies, Entertainment, and Infinite Jest.” New Literary History 30.3 (1999): 675-697.

Henry, Casey Michael. “‘Sudden Awakening to the Fact that the Mischief is Irretrievably Done’: Epiphanic Structure in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Critique 56.5 (2016): 480-502.

Hering, David. Reading the Ghost in David Foster Wallace’s Fiction.Orbit 5.2 (2017): n. pag. Web. Rpt. of Hering, David Foster Wallace: Fiction and Form, 15-40.

. “Theorising David Foster Wallace’s Toxic Postmodern Spaces.” US Studies Online 18 (2011): n. pag. Web.

Himmelheber, Rachel Haley. “‘I Believed She Could Save Me’: Rape Culture in David Foster Wallace’s ‘Brief Interviews with Hideous Men #20.” Critique 55.5 (2014): 522-35.

Hogg, Emily J. “Subjective Politics in The Pale King.” English Studies 95.1 (2014): 59-69.

Holland, Mary K. “‘The Art’s Heart’s Purpose’: Braving the Narcissistic Loop of David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Critique 47.3 (2006): 218-242. Rpt. in Holland, Succeeding Postmodernism. New York: Bloomsbury, 2013. 57-89.

. “‘By Hirsute Author’: Gender and Communication in the Work and Study of David Foster Wallace.” Critique 58.1 (2016): 65-78.

. “David Foster Wallace’s ‘Octet’ and the ‘Atthakavagga.’” Critique 74.3 (2016): 165-69.

. “‘Set . . . Softly Down Beside You’: Poststructural Realism in ‘Octet’ and Everything is Illuminated.” Succeeding Postmodernism: Language and Humanism in Contemporary American Literature. New York: Bloomsbury, 2013. 165-98.

. “‘Your Head Gets in the Way’: Reflecting (on) Realism from Barth to Wallace.” John Barth: A Body of Words. Ed. Gabrielle Dean and Charlie B. Harris. Victoria, TX: Dalkey, 2016. 201-31.

Houser, Heather. “Infinite Jest’s Environmental Case for Disgust.” Ecosickness in Contemporary U.S. Fiction: Environment and Affect. New York: Columbia UP, 2014.  117-66. Rpt. of Houser, “Infinite Jest’s Environmental Case for Disgust.” The Legacy of David Foster Wallace. Ed. Cohen and Konstantinou, 118-42.

. “Managing Information and Materiality in Infinite Jest.” American Literary History 26.4 (2014): 742-764.

Huehls, Mitchum. “Coda—Accounting 101: Reading the Exomodern.” After Critique: Twenty-First Century Fiction in a Neoliberal Age. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016. 159-168.

Hungerford, Amy. “On Not Reading DFW.” Making Literature Now. Post 45. Stanford: Stanford UP, 2016. 141-167.

Jackson, Edward and Joel Nicholson-Roberts. White Guys: Questioning Infinite Jest’s New Sincerity.” Orbit 5.2 (2017): n. pag. Web.

Jacobs, Timothy. “American Touchstone: the Idea of Order in Gerard Manley Hopkins and David Foster Wallace.” Comparative Literature Studies 38.3 (2001): 215-31.

. “The Brothers Incandenza: Translating Ideology in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov and David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Texas Studies in Literature and Language 49 (2007): 265-92.

. “Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Explicator 58.3 (2000): 172-75.

Jansen, Brian Douglas. “‘On the Porousness of Certain Borders’: Attending to Objects in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” English Studies in Canada 40.4 (2014): 55-77.

Kaiser, Wilson. “David Foster Wallace and the Ethical Challenge of Posthumanism.” Mosaic 47.3 (2014): 53-69.

. “Humor after Postmodernism: David Foster Wallace and Proximal Irony.” Studies in American Humor 3rd ser. 28 (2013): 31-44.

Karnicky, Jeffrey. “Kinds of Stasis in David Foster Wallace.” Contemporary Fiction and the Ethics of Modern Culture. New York: Palgrave, 2007. 91-124.

Kelly, Adam. “David Foster Wallace: the Death of the Author and the Birth of a Discipline.Irish Journal of American Studies 2 (2010): n. pag. Web.

. “David Foster Wallace and New Sincerity Aesthetics: A Reply to Edward Jackson and Joel Nicholson-Roberts.” Orbit 5.2 (2017): n.pag. Web.

. “Development Through Dialogue: David Foster Wallace and the Novel of Ideas.” Studies in the Novel 44.3 (2012): 267-83. Rpt. in Boswell, David Foster Wallace and the Long Thing, 3-22.

. “Dialectic of Sincerity: Lionel Trilling and David Foster Wallace.Post 45 (2014): n. pag. Web.

Konstantinou, Lee. “How to Be a Believer.” Cool Characters: Irony and American Fiction.  Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2016. 163-216.

. “The World of David Foster Wallace.” Boundary 2 40.3 (2013): 59-86.

Kušnír, Jaroslav. “Fiction and Commercialization in David Foster Wallace’s ‘Westward the Course of Empire Takes its Way.’” American, British and Canadian Studies 10 (2008): 209-21.

. “From Descriptive to (Meta)Meta-fictional: Form and Meaning in David Foster Wallace’s Short Fiction.” AAA: Arbeiten aus Anglistik und Amerikanistik 32.2 (2007): 319-31.

LeClair, Tom. “The Prodigious Fiction of Richard Powers, William Vollmann, and David Foster Wallace.” Critique 38 (1996): 12-37.

Letzler, David. “Encyclopedic Novels and the Cruft of Fiction: Infinite Jest’s Endnotes.” Studies in the Novel 44.3 (2012): 304-24. Rpt. in Boswell, David Foster Wallace and the Long Thing, 127-47.

Levey, Nick. “‘Analysis Paralysis’: The Suspicion of Suspicion in the Fiction of David Foster Wallace.M/C Journal 15.1 (2012): n. pag. Web.

. “On Flunking: Maximalist Description in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest,” “Data-Sickle: Maximalism and White-Collar Aesthetics in David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” Maximalism in Contemporary American Literature: The Uses of Detail. New York: Routledge, 2017. 55-75 and 76-96.

Marsh, Stephen Taylor. “Self-Sacrifice in the Autobiographical Narration of David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” Biography 39.2 (2016): 111-28.

McClanahan, Annie. “Future’s Shock: Plausibility, Preemption, and the Fiction of 9/11.” symplokē 17.1-2 (2009): 41-62.

McCumber, John. “From Scientific Revolutions to Boston AA: Philosophy and the Speaking of Matter.” On Philosophy: Notes from a Crisis. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013. 22-46.

McGurl, Mark. “The Institution of Nothing: David Foster Wallace in the Program.” Boundary 2 41.3 (2014): 27-54.

McLaughlin, Robert. “After the Revolution: US Postmodernism in the Twenty-First Century.” Narrative 21.3 (2013): 284-95.

. “Post-Postmodern Discontent: Contemporary Fiction and the Social World.” symplokē  12.1-2 (2004): 53-68. Rpt. in Fiction’s Present: Situating Contemporary Narrative Innovation. Ed. R.M. Berry and Jeffrey R. DiLeo. Albany: SUNY Press, 2008. 101-117.

. “Post-Postmodernism.” Routledge Companion to Experimental Literature. Ed. Joe Bray, Alison Gibbons, and Brian McHale. London: Routledge, 2012. 212-23.

Michaelson, Christopher. “Accounting for Meaning: On §22 of David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” Critical Perspectives on Accounting 29 (2015): 54-64.

“Business in the Work and World of David Foster Wallace.” Journal of Management Inquiry 25.2 (2016): 214-22.

Miley, Mike. “. . . And Starring David Foster Wallace as Himself: Performance and Persona in The Pale King.” Critique 57.2 (2016): 191-207.

Moore, Steven. “The First Draft of Infinite Jest.” My Back Pages. Los Angeles: Zerogram, 2017. 684-712.

Moran, Alexander. The Importance of Habits in Meredith Rand and Shane Drinion’s ‘tête-à-tête’ in The Pale King.Orbit 5.2 (2017): n. pag. Web.

Morris, David. “Lived Time and Absolute Knowing: Habit and Addiction from Infinite Jest to the Phenomenology of Spirit.” Clio 30 (2001): 374-415.

Morrissey, Tara and Lucas Thompson. “‘The Rare White at the Window’: A Reappraisal of Mark Costello and David Foster Wallace’s Signifying Rappers.” Journal of American Studies 49.1 (2015): 77-97. Rpt. in Thompson, Global Wallace: David Foster Wallace and World Literature. New York: Bloomsbury, 2016.  220-30.

Morsia, Elliott. “The Composition of ‘The Depressed Person.’” Textual Cultures 9.2 (2015): 79-99.

Mortenson, Erik R. “Xmas Junkies: Debasement and Redemption in the Work of William S. Burroughs and David Foster Wallace.Dionysos: Journal of Literature and Addiction 9.2 (1999): 37-46.

Mulhall, Stephen. “Quartet: Wallace’s Wittgenstein, Moran’s Amis.” The Self and its Shadows: A Book of Essays on Individuality as Negation in Philosophy and the Arts. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. 283-319. Rpt. in Garry L. Hagberg, Fictional Characters, Real Problems: The Search for Ethical Content in Literature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. 209-34.

Mullins, Matt. “Rewriting Language.” Postmodernism in Pieces: Materializing the Social in U.S. Fiction. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016. 103-36.

Nash, Woods. “Narrative Ethics, Authentic Integrity, and an Intrapersonal Medical Encounter in David Foster Wallace’s ‘Luckily the Account Representative Knew CPR.’” Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (2015): 96-106.

Natalini, Roberto. “David Foster Wallace and the Mathematics of Infinity.” Lettera Matematica 3.4 (2015): 245-53. Rpt. of Natalini, “David Foster Wallace and the Mathematics of Infinity.” A Companion to David Foster Wallace Studies. Ed. Boswell and Burn, 43-57.

Nichols, Catherine. “Dialogizing Postmodern Carnival: David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Critique 43.1 (2001): 3-16.

North, Michael. “A More than Infinite Jest.” Machine Age Comedy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. 163-83.

O’Connell, Michael J. “‘Your Temple is Self and Sentiment’: David Foster Wallace’s Diagnostic Novels.” Christianity and Literature 64.3 (2015): 266-92.

Olsen, Lance. “Termite Art, or Wallace’s Wittgenstein.” Review of Contemporary Fiction 13.2 (1993): 199-215.

O’Sullivan, Michael. “David Foster Wallace, Loneliness, and the ‘Pretty Much Nothing’ the University Teaches.” Literature Compass 14.7 (2017): n. pag. Web.

Oxoby, Marc. “The Mediated Trauma of September 11, 2001, in William Gibson’s Pattern Recognition and David Foster Wallace’s ‘The Suffering Channel.’” Portraying 9/11: Essays on Representations in Comics, Literature, Film and Theatre. Ed. Veronique Bragard, Christophe Dony, and Warren Rosenberg. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2011. 102-17.

Panzani, Ugo. “‘Mathematically Uncontrolled but Humanly Contained’: Narrative Iteration in Infinite Jest.” Lettera Matematica 3.4 (2015): 289-93.

Rando, David P. “David Foster Wallace and Lovelessness.” Twentieth-Century Literature 59.4 (2013): 575-95.

Ribbat, Christoph. “Being ‘Stresslessly Invisible’: The Rise and Fall of Videophony in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Bulletin of Science, Technology, and Society 30.4 (2010): 252-58.

Roache, John. ‘The Realer, More Enduring and Sentimental Part of Him’: David Foster Wallace’s Personal Library and Marginalia.Orbit 5.2 (2017): n. pag. Web.

Rocca, Alexander. “‘I don’t feel like a Genius’: David Foster Wallace, Trickle-Down Aesthetics, and the MacArthur Foundation.” Arizona Quarterly 73.1 (2017): 85-112.

Rother, James. “Reading and Riding the Post-Scientific Wave: The Shorter Fiction of David Foster Wallace.” Review of Contemporary Fiction 13.2 (1993): 216-234.

Russell, Emily. “Some Assembly Required: The Embodied Politics of Infinite Jest.” Arizona Quarterly 66.3 (2010): 147-169. Rpt. in Russell, Reading Embodied Citizenship: Disability, Narrative, and the Body Politic. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2011. 170-97.

Ryan, Judith. “David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” The Novel After Theory. New York: Columbia, 2012. 192-97.

Santel, James. “On David Foster Wallace’s Conservatism.” Hudson Review 66.4 (2014): 625-34.

Sayers, Philip. “Representing Entertainment(s) in Infinite Jest.” Studies in the Novel 44.3 (2012): 346-63. Rpt. in Boswell, David Foster Wallace and the Long Thing, 107-25.

Severs, Jeffrey. “‘Blank as the Faces on Coins’: Currency and Embodied Value(s) in David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” Critique 57.1 (2016): 52-66.

. “Collision, Illinois: David Foster Wallace and the Value of Insurance.” Modern Fiction Studies 62.1 (2016): 136-56.

. “David Foster Wallace, James Wood, and a Source for ‘Irrelevant’ Chris Fogle.” Explicator 73.2 (2015): 129-32.

Shapiro, Stephen. “From Capitalist to Communist Abstraction: The Pale King’s Cultural Fix.” Textual Practice 28.7 (2014): 1249-71.

Staes, Toon. “The Coatlicue Complex in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Explicator 72.1 (2014): 67-71.

. “‘Only Artists can Transfigure’: Kafka’s Artists and the Possibility of Redemption in the Novellas of David Foster Wallace.” Orbis Litterarum 65.6 (2010): 459-80.

. “Rewriting the Author: A Narrative Approach to Empathy in The Pale King and Infinite Jest.” Studies in the Novel 44.4 (2012): 409-27. Rpt. in Boswell, David Foster Wallace and the Long Thing, 23-42.

. “Work in Process: A Genesis for The Pale King.” English Studies 95.1 (2014): 70-84.

Toal, Catherine. “Corrections: Contemporary American Melancholy.” Journal of European Studies 33 (2003): 305-22.

Thomas, Calvin. “Art is on the Way: From the Abject Opening of Underworld to the Shitty Ending of Oblivion.” Abject Visions: Powers of Horror in Art and Visual Culture. Ed. Rina Arya and Nicholas Chare. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016. 162-90.

Thomas, Eric A. “‘Psychotic Depression’ and Suicide in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Critique 54.3 (2013): 276-291.

Thompson, Lucas. “‘Books Are Made out of Books’: David Foster Wallace and Cormac McCarthy.” Cormac McCarthy Journal 13 (2015): 3-26.

. “David Foster Wallace and ‘Blurbspeak.’Los Angeles Review of Books (2015): n. pag. Web.

. “Programming Literary Influence: David Foster Wallace’s ‘B.I. #59’.” Texas Studies in Literature and Language 56.2 (2014): 113-134. Rpt. in Thompson, Global Wallace: David Foster Wallace and World Literature. 71-84.

. “‘Sincerity with a Motive’: Literary Manipulation in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” Critique 57.4 (2016): 359-73.

Tysdal, Dan. “Inarticulation and the Figure of Enjoyment: Raymond Carver’s Minimalism Meets David Foster Wallace’s ‘A Radically Condensed History of Postindustrial Life.’” Wascana Review of Contemporary Poetry and Short Fiction 38.1 (2003): 66-83.

Valdré, Rossella. “‘The End of the Tour’: A Journey into the Mind of David Foster Wallace: A Psychoanalytic and Artistic Reflection Through the Film.” International Journal of Psychoanalysis 98.3 (2017): 909-25.

Van Ewijk, Petrus. “‘I’ and the ‘Other’: The Relevance of Wittgenstein, Buber and Levinas for an Understanding of AA’s Recovery Program in David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.” English Text Construction 2.1 (2009): 132-145.

Veggian, Henry. “Anachronisms of Authority: Authorship, Exchange Value, and David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” Boundary 2 39.3 (2012): 97-124.

Vermeulen, Pieter. “In the Fishtank: The Biopolitical Imagination in David Foster Wallace’s This Is Water and The Pale King.” Image and Narrative 14.1 (2013): 63-75.

Warren, Andrew. “Narrative Modelling and Community Organizing in The Pale King and Infinite Jest.” Studies in the Novel 44.4 (2012): 389-408. Rpt. in Boswell, David Foster Wallace and the Long Thing, 61-82.

Wilberding, James. “David Foster Wallace on Dumb Jocks and Athletic Genius.” Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44.1 (2017): 108-22.

Williams, Iain. “(New) Sincerity in David Foster Wallace’s ‘Octet.’” Critique 56.3 (2015): 299-314.

Winningham, Thomas. “‘Author Here’: David Foster Wallace and the Post-Metafictional Paradox.” Critique 56.5 (2015): 467-79.

Wouters, Conley. “‘What am I, a Machine?’: Humans, Information, and Matters of Record in David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King.” Studies in the Novel 44.4 (2012): 447-63. Rpt. in Boswell, David Foster Wallace and the Long Thing, 169-86.

 

Advertisements